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Hitting the G (Grammar) Spot

abstract:Good grammar, just like good writing, is a lifelong pursuit. You can never give up! I continue to challenge myself with the intricacies of grammar and style, not merely for my own sake, (I confess to being a very late bloomer at this topic) but more particularly as the last-resort editor of this website with a responsibility for checking our contributors' writing. For reference sources I have three different books on grammar and style and two dictionaries. I often take one or another of these with me to bedóegad, I can't believe I just admitted that. But a reference book sitting on the shelf or at your bedside is of no use when most of your writing is done on your laptop or at your office computer. Hence, you can imagine my excitement in striking the motherload with the discovery of an excellent online grammar site that I now keep bookmarked at the #1 spot on my browser tool bar, (ahem, the aforementioned G spot). It's not Grammar Girl, the mainstream site for lightweight questions. It's not the pay site of The Chicago Manuel of Style, as I'm too cheap to pay when I own the book. It is a non-profit foundation out of Hartford Connecticut with a FREE site called, Guide to Grammar and Writing. More...

article:

April 23, 2009
— It's ugly but here's what I like about it. For teaching, it's FUN, THOROUGH and SCALABLE to more complex and intricate questions. Just for the heck of it, take this quiz on "Notorious Confusables". The first one is too easy. Click on the second one or the third one.

If you read a lot you should do pretty well, as reading both enlarges your vocabulary and engenders an intrinsic sense of proper word use. Now scroll down the index on the site to browse other topics and you may spot your own weaknesses. Few people remember the definitions of the terms given to sentence structure, let alone remember the rules that apply. Most people tend to fall into common bad habitsócheck those split infinitives and dangling modifiers. And a shocking number of people routinely confuse its with it's; they're with their or there, and affect with effect and so on. If you live in a country whose language derived from British rules you do all kinds of things differently than North Americans, such as reversing quote marks, double " " versus single ' ' in sentences, and use different spellings. Just for fun, run through a few of Guide to Grammar's quizzes and then promise me that you'll bookmark this link and place it at the #1 spot on your browser toolbar. Consult often.

 

 

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