Some Member Book Selections

Cover Image of The Sorrows of an American: A Novel by Siri Hustvedt published by Picador
Cover Image of The Street of Crocodiles by Bruno Schulz, Celina Wieniewski published by Viking Press
Cover Image of Desirable Daughters by Bharati Mukherjee published by Hyperion (Adult Trd Pap)
Cover Image of Love in the Time of Zanzibar by Ms Jane Jaffer published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Cover Image of The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan published by Ballantine Books
Cover Image of The Amber Room: A Novel by Steve Berry published by Ballantine Books
Cover Image of The Double Hook by SHEILA WATSON published by New Canadian Library
Cover Image of The Flying Troutmans by Miriam Toews published by Vintage Canada
Cover Image of The Junk-Drawer Corner-Store Front-Porch Blues by John R. Powers published by Signet
Cover Image of Candide : or Optimism by Voltaire, Burton Raffel published by Yale University Press
Cover Image of The White Rhino Hotel by Bartle Bull published by Carroll & Graf Publishers
Cover Image of The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood published by Anchor Books
Cover Image of Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing published by Basic Books
Cover Image of Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt published by Touchstone Books

LATEST Feature Articles

The BC Book Award Long List: Everyone's friend Alma Lee Juror 

by  - Saturday, March 11, 2017

The moment all BC Book Publishers have been waiting for has arrived: the announcement of the longlist for this year's BC Book Awards. This is the chance to see the variety and creativity that writers, editors, book designers, and publishers have been working to bring to you. The full list is here The books that jump out at me:

  • Anosh Irani's The Parcel by Publisher: Knopf Canada
    Set in Kamathipura, Bombay’s notorious red-light district, The Parcel tells of a retired transgender sex worker named Madhu, who identifies as a “hijra”—neither man nor woman. She receives a call from the most feared brothel owner in the district and is forced to prepare a “parcel”—a young girl trafficked from the provinces—for its fate. Anosh Irani is the author of Dahanu Road, nominated for the Man Asian Literary Prize, and bestsellers, The Cripple and His Talismans and The Song of Kahunsha. His play, Bombay Black, won the Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding New Play, and his anthology, The Bombay Plays: The Matka King & Bombay Black, was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award. -BC Book Award site quote
  • Deborah Campbell's A Disappearance in Damascus: A Story of Friendship and Survival in the Shadow of War Publisher: Knopf Canada
    A Disappearance in Damascus: A Story of Friendship and Survival in the Shadow of War Award-winning journalist Deborah Campbell travels undercover to Damascus, reporting on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria following the Iraq War. When her “fixer,” a charismatic Iraqi woman who has emerged as a community leader, is seized from her side  ...More >>

  • LATEST Author Interviews

    Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance: Insights into Trump Voters 

    by  - Friday, January 27, 2017

    If you want an intimate insight into the firmament of Trump voters then J.D. Vance's bestselling book, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis (published by Harper Collins) is poignant, painful but uplifting book. It describes his childhood growing up in a struggling, dysfunctional family in eastern Kentucky and the Appalachia of America. Closures in the steel industry and the auto industry have erased well-paying jobs, the consequence of automation or globalization. This has led to profound social decline with poverty, alcohol and drug addiction eroding the values of this formerly proud and independent working-class peoples who have become welfare dependent, complacent, and a sometimes angry demographic as a result. These are the people identified as being co-opted by President Trump.

    JD Vance describes his upbringing by his "hillbilly" grandparents, without whose love and support he would have become the victim of his mother's failings, and fallen through the cracks of the system. In spite of the odds stacked against him, Vance managed to graduate from high school and turn his life around during a stint in the Marines following which he not only graduated with an undergraduate degree (paid for by veteran funds) from the state university, he was accepted into Yale Law School graduating summa cum laud, and then went on to marry a wonderful partner and live a successful life. He gave up his work in the law and now works with a California hedge fund creating economic development opportunities for the Appalachia. Now others there will have a better chance to turn their lives around as well. His first-person struggle as told in his book could help shape social service policy from this point forward. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis is a must read.

    NPR caught up with the author and here is a link to their podcast and the transcript. I hope you'll take a moment to listen. (Click title to open feature)  ...More >>

    Feature Articles >>

    2017 Winner of the BC National Nonfiction Award 

    by

    Friday, January 27, 2017

    Bookbuffet attended the BC National Nonfiction Prize again this year. This is a Canada-wide competition in its 13th year. It is the only national prize based from the West Coast. Congratulation to this year's recipient, Sandra Martin. Sandra takes home $40,000 for her book A Good Death: Making the Most of Our Final Choices published by Patrick Crean Editions/Harper Collins (April 12 2016).

    The book deals with an issue facing us all, given Canada's aging demographic and the reality of health statistics at this end of this spectrum. Whether it is the decline of an aging parent or a family member suffering from a devastating and irrecoverable illness, the question will eventually arise -- at what point does bearable cross over to unbearable, and when that time comes, what are our rights, to whom shall we turn, and how does society ensure a process exists to both serve and protect the concept of dying with dignity?

    History and the courts have witnessed a seesaw stance where ....More >>

     

     

    Book Reviews >>

    Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right 

    by

    Thursday, January 12, 2017

    The New York Times begins its review of Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right with a description of the staff writer for The New Yorker, ­who spent five years working on this book, the beginnings of which originated from an article she wrote on the Koch family that was published in the magazine in 2010.

    "Neither Charles nor David Koch agreed to talk to her, and several of the most important figures in their political network were unavailable. But she reached hundreds of sources who did want to talk: longtime conservative campaign operatives, business associates, political opponents and political finance scholars. Some of these sources spoke on the record and some did not, but all in all “Dark Money” emerges as an impressively reported and well-documented work.

    I was intrigued by her book because of the compelling -- stunning, really, in every sense of the word -- documentary on PBS's Frontline Black Money produced by investigative correspondent, Lowell Bergman who examines the shadowy world of international bribery. If you have a chance to watch this first you will want to get the book to be better informed on how world politics and the underbelly of business is being conducted. ....More >>

     

     

    Publisher News >>

    Now Hear This: Print is Not Dead-Long Live Print 

    by

    Friday, January 27, 2017

    I am a subscriber to The Columbia Journalism Review whose features capture the latest thinking on all things pertaining to the medium and the profession. Like you I am a reader of books, and a subscriber to newspapers. Like you, I've been saving the planet by ticking the "electronic version only" to my subscriptions to save the world from destroying oxygen breathing trees and burning carbon fossils on delivery of my subscription.

    But more and more I've become nostalgic for the rituals of home delivery of print copies of these items where I can make--an occasion--of sitting back in a comfortable chair with the newspaper and enjoy the page layouts, the smell of the ink and paper, the fact that advertisements are not popping up in my face (on my electronic screen), and tracking which articles I click, and feeding me information in silos of like-topics such that I am no longer served a diversity of features in the way that a well managed print publication provides.

    The breakdown between the fourth estate and its public is fewer print subscribers which means fewer advertisers which mean fewer quality staff which means poorer quality journalism and consequentially publications going into the red and off the map.

    In the publishing industry people have been predicting the return of book, and why not? Just yesterday I wanted to "lend" my copy of a book to a friend and I couldn't--it's on my iPad in digital format. And this is but one of the joys of physical book ownership that has been lost. Think of the state of your physical library, as in, those colourful and dusty shelves with copies of books you've had since the Gutenberg Press.

    All the books on my shelves are from what seems like "another era" because I have added few new titles that reflect any update in my reading habits reflecting new topics of interest. But my kindle shelves show neat little rows of book "covers" backlit in colourful pixels illuminating on my screen and floating in the cloud. No help to anyone in my household or on my trusted lending list. (the ones who return books)

    So here now is a more erudite rant on the subject from Michael Rosenwald of The CJR. ....More >>

     

    Whistler Reads >>

    From Human Rights to the Jian Ghomeshi Sex Scandal 

    by

    Thursday, February 16, 2017

    Join Whistler Reads on Thursday March 16th at the Squamish Lil'Wat Cultural Centre (SLCC) from 7-9:30 pm when we host two of Canada's prominent investigative journalists to discuss their latest books. Tickets/books here. Meet Alexandra Shimo and Kevin Donovan.

    Kevin Donovan is an investigative reporter and editor at Toronto Star. He has won three National Newspaper Awards, two Michener Awards and three Canadian Association of Journalists Awards. In 2014 his team broke the story on the Jian Ghomeshi sex scandal. His book on the subject, Secret Life: The Jian Ghomeshi Investigation (published by Gooselane Editions) covers the investigation and trial from start to finish.

    Readers will recall Ghomeshi's public admission to a preference for "rough sex", claiming his partners were willing participants. Whistlerites will recall Jian Ghomeshi's visit to our fine town in 2012 to chat up that year's Giller Prize author at the local writers' fest. The most memorable thing to me was how fast his affable demeanor switched over to agitated annoyance when he noticed bottled water had been placed on the staging table between him and Will Fergusen. He stopped the program until a carafe of tap water was brought in, but not good enough, he wanted the offending bottled water removed from view and his presence! Everyone waited through the awkward moment and silently took note.

    Later that year, the CBC's decision to fire their superstar host of their most popular program, "Q" for allegations of conduct unbecoming were followed by a subsequent criminal investigation with charges laid, and a sensational trial that resulted in his acquittal. This case created a lightning rod for debate. Kevin's talk will discuss how journalists operate in the murky waters when it is one person's word against another and how this issue compounds when a celebrity is implicated and when the justice system gets involved.

    Joining Donovon is Alexandra Shimo, a former editor at MacLeans Magazine. Alexandra Shimo spent four months living in an isolated fly-in First Nations community in northern Ontario investigating an alleged water crisis that may have been fabricated. Inevitably, she becomes drawn into the daily life of the community and conditions on reserve---that of severe poverty, isolation, youth suicide at crises proportions, and other issues garnered from her very personal vantage, which results in PTSD and more. Readers will better understand why this book is so important when they... ....More >>

     

     

    WGBH Boston >>

    Masterpiece: Victoria 

    by

    Tuesday, January 03, 2017

    The 2017 MASTERPIECE PBS season starts out tapping into the insatiable public appetite for young Royals, specifically, British. Their new series about Queen Victoria, titled VICTORIA airs January 15th and is based on the screenplay written by Daisy Goodwin. Buy the hardcover book, Victoria: The Heart and Mind of a Young Queen which is the official companion to the Masterpiece Presentation on PBS, and the DVD box set "Masterpiece: Victoria" .

    It stars Jenna Coleman as the young queen portrayed from her coronation in 1837 at the age of 18 through her courtship and marriage to her cousin Prince Albert played by Tom Hughes. Goodwin says her inspiration for Victoria derived from watching her own teenage daughter's vigorous and tempestuous nature and imagining how a monarch at the same age might compare. In this sense, the character takes on a personalized flare.

    While the series has been criticized for taking liberties with some specific historical facts in order to make her character more congruent with modern sensibilities and perspectives, it has all the hallmarks of beloved PBS productions that includes an exquisite cast, costumes, sets and settings. As a result, it has usurped viewer turnout for previous period costume dramas, reaching 5.3 million viewers with a production budget of £10m.

    So who was Queen Victoria and what were her hallmark contributions to British history? ....More >>

     

     

    Wine & Book Club >>

    Wine & Book Group Pick for Jan-Feb 2016 

    by

    Friday, January 01, 2016

    It's winter - let's revel in that. Who better to read this January and February than Sheila Watts-Cloutier, the Inuit writer whose book The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet is a manifesto on climate change and its effect on the indigenous peoples of Canada's north. Cloutier is a compelling speaker. I've listened to her in the media and on several radio programs. This book will change the way you view the plight of peoples of the North. Sheila is a member of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, the non-governmental body representing the interests of Inuit people living in four Arctic nations. This led to her becoming a powerful advocate for Inuit rights at United Nations climate-change negotiations that garnered her nomination for a Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.

    But the details of her upbringing and the stark contrast between the experience of living at home in the North compared with living at a lower latitude with a non-indigenous family during her formative years, highlights the importance of cultural identity and traditions.

    As Naomi Klein writes in the Mar 13th issue of The Globe and Mail:

    As the title of the book suggests, a major theme of The Right to Be Cold is how climate change poses an existential threat to cultures that are embedded in ice and snow. If the ice disappears, or if it behaves radically differently, then cultural knowledge that has been passed on from one generation to the next loses its meaning. Young people are deprived of the lived experience on the ice that they need to become knowledge carriers, while the animals around which so many cultural practices revolve disappear. As Watt-Cloutier has been arguing for well over a decade now, that means that the failure of the world to act to reduce its emissions to prevent that outcome constitutes a grave human-rights violation.

    While some may snicker and say more NK hyperbole, we all know that the arctic at both poles are the puffin/penguin in the tunnel, and haunting images of polar bears clinging to a slab of ice condemn us all. Awareness is the forerunner to action, and the time for rhetoric has passed. We each need to become part of the solution to solving our planet's climate change issues. ....More >>

     

     

    Author Interviews >>

    NY Review of Books: Canadian Authors in Caricature 

    by

    Wednesday, January 04, 2017

    I had a lawyer friend when we lived in Los Angeles who happened to be the nephew of a famous New York society cartoonist. He divulged an interesting factoid about this relative that has always fascinated me. When sketching his subjects live at New York plays, the Met and Broadway musicals, he used a small pencil and scratch pad from within his jacket pocket to do the work - sight unseen - so as not to distract or attract the attention of onlookers. A remarkable feat.

    If you have an interest in these sorts of artistic profiles you can go to the wonderful publishing house of The NY Review of Books who have amassed a collection by four artists: David Levine (whose more than 3,500 caricatures have illuminated articles published in the Review since 1963); and John Springs, Pancho (Francisco Grails), and James Ferguson whose works have been published regularly in the Review over the past few years. Preview the extensive list in alphabetical sequence, or enter a subject or category into the search box to obtain a grouping of interest. As a bibliophile and a Canadian I chose the category "Canadian Authors" and came up with David Levine's wonderful collection - a work in progress, judging by the short list. It's all ON SALE right now if you act quickly. ....More >>

     

     

    Technology Corner >>

    Why Lament the Takeover of Songza by Google? 

    by

    Monday, February 01, 2016

    When I first started using Songza a few years ago [circa 2012] I felt both elated and relieved! Elated that someone with brains had designed a music app that cost nothing and provided endless hours of streaming playlists curated to any musical genre or mortal mood, all coordinated around hypothetical tasks at any particular time of day in the week. It was a relief to finally pack up my CD collection, which I had reverted to in frustration after Apple had once too often dumped my music library and carefully organized personal playlists for the zillionth time during yet another forced system upgrade to my iPod or iPhone - sorry Apple, not everyone has a PhD in computer science to manage the workarounds!

    Now another technology behemoth has bought Songza along with all their clever ideas and my favorite playlists. What is in store for us? Well on January 31st we ....More >>

     

     

    Events >>

    FOLD - May 4-7th Brampton Ont 

    by

    Sunday, March 26, 2017

    If the axiom of good writing is "Write what you know", then perhaps the axiom of a good reader should be "Read what you don't know." That's how I see FOLD, Canada's first literary festival celebrating literary diversity. It's founded by Jael Richardson and takes place in her hometown of Brampton, Ontario now in its second season, coming May 4-7 2017. "The Festival of Literary Diversity will celebrate stories that are underrepresented in Canadian literature — stories that reflect variations in geography, ethnicity, race, culture, gender, ability, sexual orientation, and religion, and stories that employ different methods of story-telling." Check out the 25 programs on offer over 3 days. The FOLD will utilize a “three-fold” approach in the programming: engaging readers, inspiring writers, and empowering educators. The main festival runs from Friday, May 6 to Sunday, May 8, but the larger festival includes a workshop for educators and sessions dedicated towards high school students.

    What I didn't know is that "Brampton is Canada’s second fastest growing city and the ninth largest city in the country. Located immediately north of Lester B. Pearson International Airport, Brampton residents represent more than 170 different cultures and speak more than 70 languages. People have literally come from around the world to live, work, play, read, and write in this City." Speaking as a Vancouverite - that's a wonderful distinction to celebrate! ....More >>

     

     
     
     
     

    MASH UP >>

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    Some Member Book Selections

    Cover Image of The Diary of Anne Frank: The Revised Critical Edition by Netherlands Institute For War Documentation published by Doubleday
    Cover Image of What Casanova Told Me : A Novel by Susan Swan published by Bloomsbury USA
    Cover Image of Cannery Row by John Steinbeck published by Penguin USA (Paper)
    Cover Image of Adam and His Kin: The Lost History of Their Lives and Times by Ruth Beechick, Michael Denman published by Arrow Pr
    Cover Image of An Imperfect Offering: Humanitarian Action for the Twenty-First Century by James Orbinski published by Walker & Company
    Cover Image of L'Alchimiste by Paul Coelho published by French and European Publishing, Inc.
    Cover Image of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, Edith Grossman, Harold Bloom published by Ecco
    Cover Image of The Language of Flowers: A Novel by Vanessa Diffenbaugh published by Ballantine Books
    Cover Image of The Birth of Venus by Sarah Dunant published by Random House
    Cover Image of Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult published by Washington Square Press
    Cover Image of The Third Man and The Fallen Idol (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) by Graham Greene published by Penguin Classics
    Cover Image of A Rare and Curious Gift: A Novel by Pauline Holdstock published by W. W. Norton & Company
    Cover Image of A Summer of Faulkner: As I Lay Dying/The Sound and the Fury/Light in August (Oprah's Book Club) by William Faulkner published by Vintage Books USA
    Cover Image of American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird, Martin J. Sherwin published by Vintage
     

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